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Here, we highlight the 49 gallery shows (from a 20th-century mystic and abstract painter to a Facebook diarist–painter–photographer) and museum exhibitions (including disruptive surveys, post-war artist retrospectives, and a massive show featuring more than 60 black artists) we’re most excited to see this fall, and how long they’re on view.

New York University’s latest photography exhibit showcased at Grey Art Gallery, titled NeoRealismo: The New Image in Italy, 1932-1960, features a collection of 174 images from over 60 Italian photographers. As the title references, the photographs are from Italy before, during, and after World War II. The concept of neorealism was a cinematic and literary movement that showed the disastrous postwar conditions, helping inspire this collection.

How should photography respond to Fascism and its aftermath? An ambitious exhibition, which opened September 6 at New York University’s Grey Art Gallery and Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò, features images made by 60 Italian photographers in the period from the height of Mussolini’s rule through Italy’s post-war economic boom. Curated by Enrica Viganò, “NeoRealismo: The New Image in Italy, 1932-1960” has already toured Europe.

Grey Art Gallery/NYU will open its doors to an exhibition portraying life in Italy through the lens of photographers before, during and after World War II in NeoRealismo: The New Image in Italy, 1932-1960. Featuring 175 photographs by over 60 Italian artists, NeoRealismo displays the photos with the original publications in which they circulated ~ illustrated magazines, photobooks, […]

In 1932, to commemorate the first decade of Fascist rule in Italy, Benito Mussolini inaugurated the Exhibition of the Fascist Revolution in Rome. The exhibition, which consisted of 23 rooms filled with myriad forms of art, historical documentation, and artifacts, stayed on display for two years. It proved a massive success, drawing more than 2.8 million visitors.

Roberto Rossellini’s Rome, Open City was filmed as WW2 continued to devastate Northern Italy. It was distributed in movie theaters in war-torn Italy, and was received with lukewarm reviews by many Italian critics. Nevertheless, it unexpectedly ended up being a success both in Italy and, perhaps even more surprisingly, in the United States. In New York, in particular, long lines would form in front of the theaters in which it was being shown. As director Otto Preminger said, the history of cinema can be divided into two parts: before, and after, Rome, Open City.

Italy, 1930-1960. A country divided before it was even really united. The Italian population was fragmented, turned out by the war, slave of a regime. It was desperately seeking freedom, it was desperately looking for its own identity. At that time Italy needed to be real, needed to look in the face the desecration of its beauty perpetuated by strangers’ hands and ultimately by the Italians themselves. It was first chaos, then war, then misery, then triumph, then rebuild, then rebirth.